Our science

Secoes Bioremediation Organic Microbial Balanced Technology (OMBT) product is an innovative, proprietary blend of 100% natural, fast-acting bacteria, archaea, fungi and algal protists formulated to remediate targeted pollutants from:

  • domestic wastewater and sludge
  • wastewater collection systems
  • industrial/commercial facility and farm operation wastewater and sludges
  • contaminated waste spills/emergency response site soil/water/groundwater
  • Surface water, crop irrigation supply water
  • Aquaculture waters and sludge

The microbes in the Bioremediation OMBT product are all natural, non-genetically modified, and soil-based.  Our microbes thrive symbiotically with desired beneficial microbes found in wastewater (activated sludge) and wastewater sludge processes, and with microbes found in nature (waterways, ponds and soil).  The product is safe to use in waterways, stormwater, lakes and ponds, and soil. 

Natural. Fast-Acting. Proprietary.

The microbes in the Bioremediation OMBT product are all natural, non-genetically modified, and soil-based.  Our microbes thrive symbiotically with desired beneficial microbes found in wastewater (activated sludge) and wastewater sludge processes, and with microbes found in nature (waterways, ponds and soil).  The product is safe to use in waterways, stormwater, lakes and ponds, and soil.

Secoes Bioremediation OMBT product contains the following constituents:

60 +/- species of bacteria.  The bacteria strains included in the Bioremediation OMBT product target both organic and inorganic pollutants in all types of environmental conditions and include the following:

  • Aerobic bacteria
  • Facultative bacteria
  • Anaerobic bacteria
  • Autotrophic bacteria
  • Heterotrophic bacteria
  • Halophilic bacteria
  • Chemoautotrophic bacteria
  • Chemoheterotrophic bacteria
  • Chemoorganoheterotroph bacteria

Learn more about our bacteria

Bacteria. A discussion of the specific action of 4 of the 60 +/- bacteria strains contained in the Bioremediation OMBT product are discussed below.

Bacillus and Pseudomonas bacteria – Both of these bacteria species are excellent for digesting organic waste (food processors, wineries, dairies, manure), as well as hydrocarbons (oils and greases, lubricants, certain herbicides, and pesticides). Bacillus is an excellent treatment bacteria, the most common type of bacteria used by wastewater treatment plants. Bacillus is effective for treating fats, oils, greases, and proteins. The several strains of Pseudomonas contained in our product are ideal for the rapid treatment of wastewater with high concentrations of sugar and carbohydrates. Bioremediation OMBT product contains multiple strains of Bacillus as well as two proven strains of Pseudomonas: Pseudomonas fluorescens and Pseudomonas putida. Both have additional important benefits. Fluorescens can grow in water temperatures as low as 5 degrees Celsius, which makes it far more beneficial than Bacillus in treatment ponds during winter months. Pseudomonas fluorescens has been shown to partially or completely degrade complex organic pollutants such as styrene, TNT, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs).

Nitrosomonas and Nitrospira bacteria – Both of these bacteria are considered the most active in nitrification and denitrification. Together (through the two-step process), they will remove ammonia and ammonium from the water, given that available dissolved oxygen is in the source water to support this reaction. In this process, ammonia-nitrogen is converted into nitrate via naturally occurring bacteria known as “nitrifiers”. Specifically, as an initial reaction, nitrosomonas converts ammonia (NH3) to nitrite (NO2). Then nitrospira works in a second reaction to convert nitrite (NO2) to nitrate (NO3). The nitrification process is vital to the biological removal of ammonia-nitrogen from water (and wastewater). EPA and many state agencies are now establishing limits for nitrogen and nitrate discharges to minimize impacts to surface and ground water resources. Since domestic wastewater sources, certain industrial wastewater sources, many rivers, waterways and irrigation canals will have some level of ammonia or ammonium, these nitrogen source will be consumed and remediated by the bacteria, as well as other target pollutants.

14 +/- species of archaea. The archaea species included in the Bioremediation OMBT product have significant pollutant reduction capabilities. Archaea can oxidize ammonia and can simultaneously nitrify heterotrophically and denitrify aerobically with dissolved oxygen concentrations as low as 0.3 mg/L. Archaea are typically two orders of magnitude smaller than bacteria. This characteristic results in an increase in the amount of pollutants consumed per unit volume of waste, associated with archaea cellular respiration and growth[2].

  • 15 +/- species of fungi. The fungi species in the Bioremediation OMBT product enhance biodegradation of targeted pollutants by secreting extracellular enzymes that break down both conventional and toxic organic pollutants, which are then absorbed into the fungal colony and are ultimately removed from the treated wastewater stream [3]. Fungi (and the enzymes they secrete) are also effective in the degradation of highly toxic human-generated waste, including petroleum, heavy metals, plastics, and pesticides. Recent studies have found, for instance, that certain fungi can remediate oil spills, decompose the cellulose in disposable baby diapers, as well as micropollutants (endocrine-disrupting chemicals, personal care products and other biological active compounds). But the most exciting are study findings that show that certain fungi are effective in the reduction and control of virulent E. coli [4].
  • 5 +/- species of algal protists. The algae protists in the Bioremediation OMBT product are microorganisms that act as bioremediators when performing co-cultivations with fungal cells. Algal protists have been found to enhance the biodegradation of targeted pollutants, including chemical oxygen demand (COD), total oil & grease, total phosphorous, total nitrogen, iron, and zinc, as shown in a recent (2017) research study [5].
  • Water: The Bioremediation OMBT product contains water for culture medium packaging.

 

Bioremediation OMBT is formulated to treat specific targeted wastes commonly found in waste streams, water supply sources, groundwater and soil.  The specific pollutants that can be reduced by the Bioremediation OMBT product include:

Conventional, simple organic and inorganic pollutants degraded: 

  • salt (sodium & chloride)
  • iron, zinc, heavy metals
  • ammonia/ammonium
  • total oil & grease (O&G)
  • biochemical oxygen demand (BOD)
  • chemical oxygen demand (COD)
  • total suspended solids (TSS)
  • total dissolved solids (TDS)
  • total nitrogen (TN)
  • total phosphorous (TP)
  • fecal coliform, E.Coli 

Complex organic, hydrocarbon & total toxic organic (TTO) pollutants degraded

  • styrene process tars
  • methacrylate process tars
  • methyl ethyl ketone
  • oxolane
  • benzene
  • carbon tetrachloride
  • toluene
  • ethylbenzene
  • styrene
  • O.M.P. xylene
  • phenol
  • methyl styrene isomers
  • dimethyl benzenemethanol
  • dimethyl phenol isomers
  • ethyl methylphenol
  • chlorobenzene
  • choloform
  • dichloroethane isomers
  • methylene chloride
  • methylene bromide
  • dichloroethylene isomers
  • trichloroethylene isomers
  • vinyl chloride
  • tetrachloroethylene
  • anthracene
  • benzo(a)anthracene
  • bis(2 chloroethyl)ether
  • dichlorobenzene isomers
  • di-n-butyl phthalates
  • di-n-octyl phthalates
  • flourene
  • flouranthene
  • hexachlorobenzene
  • naphthalene
  • phenanthrene
  • pyrene
  • dibenzofuran
  • methylnaphthalene isomers
  • cyclohezene-1-yl-benzene
  • biphenyl
  • acetone
  • methyl pentanone isomers
  • methyl cyclohexane
  • benzenamine
  • ethyl cyclohexane
  • methylcyclopentane
  • PCB
  • cresol
  • cyanide
  • TNT
  • Micropollutants degraded:
  • endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs)
  • personal care products (PCPs)
  • other biological active compounds

Bioremediation OMBT product microbes consume many conventional pollutants, micropollutants, organic pollutants, and inorganic pollutants (including salt) to sustain growth and reproduction.  Microbes perform coupled oxidation/reduction (redox) reactions to live, and bioremediation exploits these reactions to remove contaminants from contaminated media (water, wastewater, groundwater, soil).  Bacteria also produce enzymes that reduce pollutants (enzymes, including amylase, protease, lipase, esterase, urease, cellulase, xylanase, and a series of hydrocarbon degrading enzymes). Microbes can use different electron acceptors (oxidized compounds) and electron donors (reduced compounds) in the three major oxidation pathways — aerobic respiration, anaerobic respiration, and fermentation.  Bioremediation processes can use all of these pathways, and contaminant degradation may occur through direct metabolism, cometabolism, or abiotic transformations that may result from microbe biological activities.

The specific scientific mechanisms used to reduce organic matter, ammonia/ammonium pollutants, and more complex organic pollutants by the Bioremediation OMBT product are described and presented below:

  • Organic matter & ammonia/ammonium reduction processes
  • Complex molecule degradation – anaerobic conversion organic matter, lipids and volatile fatty acids (VFAs)
  • Metals degradation process
  • Salt bio-remediation processes

Salt Bio-remediation Processes

The Secoes Bioremediation OMBT product has an extremely high bacteria reproductive rate and includes diverse strains of naturally occurring bacteria.  Our laboratory treatability and field remediation case studies show significant reduction of salt (TDS, sodium and chloride) in both water and soil media.  The two major processes associated with the reduction of salts by microbes (i.e., bacteria) are discussed below.

Adsorption process.  Many microbes require certain amounts of salt components to replicate and grow. These microbes adsorb salt for this purpose. Although most bacteria can only tolerate moderate concentrations of salt, some bacteria (Halophilic bacteria) thrive on higher salt concentrations. Once the salt components are adsorbed by the bacteria, they excrete organic acids during their salt chelation process. Overall, there is less salt in the soil, soil solution and water, and the soil particles become buffered with an infusion of magnesium, potassium. So the overall benefit is reduced salt components in the soil, soil solution, and water, and a soil particle surface buffering layer that repels salts and protects plants from the harmful effects of salt.

Natural bacteria cell desalination process. Certain microbes have the ability to reduce salt compounds (i.e., desalinate) water by modifying the electricity generated by the bacteria. Some of the bacteria will naturally produce electrons and protons inside their cells and transport them outside their cells.  Some bacteria produce Exo-poly saccharides (EPSs) that will bind to cations (including the Na+ in salt), thus making it unavailable to plants under saline conditions. Other bacteria scavenge free electrons and protons and use them as fuel to create hydrogen, methane or other chemicals, which can serve as energy sources. The entire process leaves almost pure — about 90 % — water behind.  This process is called that “microbial fuel cell” process.  The exact purity of the water can be changed depending on the needs of the project or the desalination industry if the process is scaled up commercially. These microbial cells can reduce the salt in water.  This process is beneficial in that it naturally reduces and remediates salt associated with impacted irrigation and water supply sources, contaminated sites, and can be used to generate power as a byproduct.

Salt remediation processes in soils & soil solutions
The Secoes Bioremediation OMBT product has an extremely high bacteria reproductive rate and includes diverse strains of naturally occurring bacteria. Our laboratory treatability and field remediation case studies show significant reduction of salt (TDS, sodium and chloride) in both water and soil media. The two major processes associated with the reduction of salts by microbes (i.e., bacteria) are discussed below.